The Buddha in Your Mirror

Practical Buddhism and the Search for Self

The Buddha in Your Mirror

While the notion that “happiness can found within oneself” has recently become popular, Buddhism has taught for thousands of years that every person is a Buddha, or enlightened being, and has the potential for true and lasting happiness. Through real-life examples, the authors explain how adopting this outlook has positive effects on one’s health, relationships, and career, and gives new insights into world environmental concerns, peace issues, and other major social problems.

The Buddha in Your Rearview Mirror

A Guide to Practicing Buddhism in Modern Life

The Buddha in Your Rearview Mirror

This book is a sophisticated but accessible introduction to Buddhism, as well as an in-depth study of Buddhism in the Samurai period. Hochswender again focuses on the philosophy of Nichiren and applies its principles to everyday issues ranging from health to careers to family problems.

Religion and Science in the Mirror of Buddhism

Religion and Science in the Mirror of Buddhism

This book offers a Buddhist perspective on the conflict between religion and science in contemporary western society. Examining Buddhist history, authors Francisca Cho and Richard K. Squier offer a comparative analysis of Buddhist and western scientific epistemologies that transcends the limitations of non-Buddhist approaches to the subject of religion and science. The book is appropriate for undergraduates, graduate students, and researchers interested in comparative religion or in the intersection of religion and science and Buddhist Studies.

The Buddha Next Door

Ordinary People, Extraordinary Stories

The Buddha Next Door

Through personal experiences, this anthology illuminates how the practice of Nichiren Buddhism has changed people’s lives for the better. These first-person narratives—representing people from all across the country of various ages and ethnic backgrounds—examine the challenges of daily life associated with health, relationships, career, and aging, and the ensuing experiences of hope, success, inspiration, and personal enlightenment that come about as a result of living as Nichiren Buddhists.

Buddhism: A Complete Introduction: Teach Yourself

Teach Yourself

Buddhism: A Complete Introduction: Teach Yourself

Buddhism: A Complete Introduction is a comprehensive and easy-to-use introduction, designed to give you everything you need to succeed, all in one place. Written by a leading expert, this book will help you if you are studying for an important exam or essay, or if you simply want to improve your knowledge. It is structured to mirror the way in which Buddhism is usually taught, starting with the life of the Buddha through to the prospects of Buddhism for the next generation. The book covers all the key areas that are considered central to Buddhism, including the Buddha's teachings, the scriptures and schools, the role of meditation and the moral and ethical context. It uses jargon-free English and includes features such as guided further reading and end of chapter questions to ensure that you understand all the concepts covered.

Shaping the Lotus Sutra

Buddhist Visual Culture in Medieval China

Shaping the Lotus Sutra

The Lotus Sutra has been the most widely read and most revered Buddhist scripture in East Asia since its translation in the third century. The miracles and parables in the "king of sutras" inspired a variety of images in China, in particular the sweeping compositions known as transformation tableaux that developed between the seventh and ninth centuries. Surviving examples in murals painted on cave walls or carved in relief on Buddhist monuments depict celestial journeys, bodily metamorphoses, cycles of rebirth, and the achievement of nirvana. Yet the cosmos revealed in these tableaux is strikingly different from that found in the text of the sutra. Shaping the Lotus Sutra explores this visual world. Challenging long-held assumptions about Buddhist art, Eugene Wang treats it as a window to an animated and spirited world. Rather than focus on individual murals as isolated compositions, Wang views the entire body of pictures adorning a cave shrine or a pagoda as a visual mapping of an imaginary topography that encompasses different temporal and spatial domains. He demonstrates that the text of the Lotus Sutra does not fully explain the pictures and that a picture, or a series of them, constitutes its own "text." In exploring how religious pictures sublimate cultural aspirations, he shows that they can serve both political and religious agendas and that different social forces can co-exist within the same visual program. These pictures inspired meditative journeys through sophisticated formal devices such as mirroring, mapping, and spatial programming - analytical categories newly identified by Wang. The book examines murals in cave shrines at Binglingsi and Dunhuang in northwestern China and relief sculptures in the grottoes of Yungang in Shanxi, on stelae from Sichuan, and on the Dragon-and-Tiger pagoda in Shandong, among other sites. By tracing formal impulses in medieval Chinese picture-making, such as topographic mapping and pictorial illusionism, the author pieces together a wide range of visual evidence and textual sources to reconstruct the medieval Chinese cognitive style and mental world. The book is ultimately a history of the Chinese imagination. Read an interview with the author: http://dgeneratefilms.com/cinematalk/cinematalk-interview-with-professor-eugene-wang-on-chinese-art-and-film/

Wagner's Parsifal

The Journey of a Soul

Wagner's Parsifal

Parsifal was Richard Wagner's last opera, and many consider it his most beautiful and moving work. Peter Bassett, author of the highly successful A RING FOR THE MILLENNIUM, has made a special study of Parsifal, looking particularly at the relationship between Wagner's sources and his text and identifying important thematic connections with other works, notably DER RING DES NIBELUNG. This guide - which includes a translation of the libretto - will be invaluable to those new to Parsifal, but will also provide fresh insights for readers who are already familiar with Wagner's final work. This new edition is illustrated with historical photographs and a new format.

Annual Review of Nursing Education, Volume 5, 2007

Challenges and New Directions in Nursing Education

Annual Review of Nursing Education, Volume 5, 2007

This timely volume in the Springer Annual Review of Nursing Education series reflects the hottest issues and trends igniting national discourse today. Written by nurse educators and focused on the practice of teaching across settings, the Annual Review provides educators in associate, baccalaureate, and graduate nursing programs, staff development, and continuing education with an array of strategies to expand their horizons and enrich their teaching. From the lessons nurse educators and students learned in surviving the Gulf coast hurricanes to the impact of foreign nurses' immigration on American nursing education, Volume 5 presents topics in the vanguard of nursing education concerns. Topics included in this volume: Standardized patients in nursing education Strategy for teaching cultural competence Managing difficult student situations Challenges calling American nurses to think and act globally Using benchmarking for continuous quality improvement E-portfolios in nursing education

The Mirror of Zen

The Classic Guide to Buddhist Practice by Zen Master So Sahn

The Mirror of Zen

The sacred radiance of our original nature never darkens. It has shined forth since beginningless time. Do you wish to enter the gate that leads to this? Simply do not give rise to conceptual thinking. Zen Master So Sahn (1520–1604) is a towering figure in the history of Korean Zen. In this treasure-text, he presents in simple yet beautiful language the core principles and teachings of Zen. Each section opens with a quotation—drawn from classical scriptures, teachings, and anecdotes—followed by the author’s commentary and verse. Originally written in Chinese, the text was translated into Korean in the mid-twentieth century by the celebrated Korean monk Boep Joeng. An American Zen monk, Hyon Gak, has translated it into English.