Anatomy of Change

A Way to Move Through Life's Transitions

Anatomy of Change

The body’s innate capacity for feeling, intuition, and compassion can enable us to heal our physical and emotional wounds. In The Anatomy of Change, Richard Heckler draws on Aikido and Lomi Body Work to demonstrate how a set of practices can bring new awareness and choice into our daily life.

The Anatomy of Change

The Anatomy of Change

The Anatomy of Change is a book of yesterday, today and tomorrow. The "past" is looked at as relevant; the “now” is discussed with enlightened passion and the "future" is filled with hope and reconciliation according to the author, Waliyyuddin Sabir. I found myself anxious to go to the next page to read more of the straight-forward truth that was provoking me to think thoughts that I had buried in the past. Yet, causing me to realize that those thoughts are relevant to today and painfully helpful for better tomorrows. This book is powerful and necessary in our society and the real blessing will come when we go past reading the book and “do the book”. Reverend Linda K. Shepard

The Anatomy of Change

A Neo-institutionalist Perspective

The Anatomy of Change

Globalization, the new economy, and the IT revolution are some of the words used when researchers â?? as well as practitioners â?? try to explain the seemingly ever-increasing speed of change in contemporary society. Whatever the label, organizations today are facing change in a host of different ways. Sometimes they act as "change-takers," forced to adapt to changes and innovations coming from the outside. At other times they are "change-makers," who foster innovation and change, giving them a competitive advantage or a heightened legitimacy. Sometimes they force others to adapt to these changes. The analyses presented in this volume provide ample evidence of how the perspective of new institutionalism can help in understanding the anatomy of change, and how some actors avoid complete stasis through utilizing small openings instead of breaking down the whole wall.

Permanence and Change

An Anatomy of Purpose, Third Edition

Permanence and Change

Permanence and Change was written and first published in the depths of the Great Depression. Attitudes Toward History followed it two years later. These were revolutionary texts in the theory of communication, and, as classics, they retain their surcharge of energy. Permanence and Change treats human communication in terms of ideal cooperation, whereas Attitudes Towards History characterizes tactics and patterns of conflict typical of actual human associations. It is in Permanence and Change that Burke establishes in path-breaking fashion that form permeates society just as it does poetry and the arts. Hence, his master idea that forms of art are not exclusively aesthetic: the cycles of a storm, the gradations of a sunrise, the stages of an epidemic, the undoing of Prince Hamlet are all instances of progressive form. This new edition of Permanence and Change reprints Hugh Dalziel Duncan's long sociological introduction and includes a substantial new afterward in which Burke reexamines his early ideas in light of subsequent developments in his own thinking and in social theory.

The Anatomy of a Game

Football, the Rules, and the Men who Made the Game

The Anatomy of a Game

Looks at how rule changes have shaped the game of college football

The Anatomy of Work

Labor, Leisure, and the Implications of Automation

The Anatomy of Work

The consequences of narrow work specialization are critical not only for workers and employers but for civilization as a whole. In The Anatomy of Work, George Friedmann elucidates the large and small questions raised by this evolutionary moment in human labor and development. Donald C. King's introduction to this new edition discusses the impact of Friedmann's work on later researchers and assesses its relative strengths and weaknesses in forecasting future trends, particularly in regard to automation. This is pioneering study on how work is organic to human identity.

The Anatomy of Psychotherapy

The Anatomy of Psychotherapy

Over the past decades, Lawrence Friedman has emerged as one of the most erudite and provocative theoriss in contemporary psychotherapy. The Anatomy of Psychotherapy interweaves Friedman's major contributions to the analytic and psychiatric literature with extensive new material in arriving at an extraordinarily rich and nuanced appreciation of psychotherapy. The Anatomy of Psychotherapy describes how the therapist makes use of theories and styles in order to achieve equilibrium under stress. This stress, according to Friedman, is related to the "absolute ambiguity" that is essential to psychotherapy. To cope with this ambiguity, the therapist alternates among three different roles, those of reader, historian, and pragmatic operator. Friedman examines these "disambiguating postures" in detail, paying special attention to their bearing on the therapist's narrative prejudice, the relativity of his knowledge, and the relationship of his work to natural science and hermeneutics. Brilliantly constructed and masterfully written, The Anatomy of Psychotherapy traverses the same basic themes in each of its six sections. Readers who are interested in theory can hone in on relevant topics or the work of particular theorists. Readers seeking insight into the demands of daily clinical work, on the other hand, can bypass the systematic studies and immerse themselves in Friedman's engrossing reflections on the experience of psychotherapy. Best served will be those who ponder Friedman's writings and therapy as complementary meditations issuing from a single, unifying vision, one in which psychotherapy, in both its promise and frustrations, becomes a subtle interplay among theories about psychotherapy, the personal styles of psychotherapists, and the practical exigencies of aiding those in distress.