The Goddess Is in the Details

Wisdom for the Everyday Witch

The Goddess Is in the Details

From the hearth to the altar, make magic in every moment. Being a Witch isn't limited to casting a spell under the full moon or consecrating a ritual circle. Whether you're calling the Goddess or doing the dishes, your wonderfully witchy ways are woven into everything you do. With her signature down-to-earth wisdom and warmth, Deborah Blake takes you into the heart of what it means to be a Witch all day, every day. Filled to the brim with practical suggestions, Pagan and Wicca spells, and helpful advice, this essential book brings to light all facets of a modern Witch's life: The seven core beliefs of Witches, mindful eating and health, creating sacred space at home, relationships with non-Pagans, sex and the single Witch, raising Pagan children, solitary and coven practice, Pagan ritual, and green living. "Deborah Blake has created a practical method of weaving the spiritual into the daily chores of the mundane world in which we must live."-Edain McCoy, author of Advanced Witchcraft and If You Want to Be a Witch

Nine Nights of the Goddess

The Navaratri Festival in South Asia

Nine Nights of the Goddess


Everyday Witchcraft

Making Time for Spirit in a Too-Busy World

Everyday Witchcraft

Walk your personal Pagan path with grace and wisdom, integrating a spiritual practice into your life in just a few minutes per week. Simple, fun, and easy to follow, Everyday Witchcraft shows that, no matter how busy or hectic life is, even small acts can add meaning and depth to your life. This remarkable book is filled with creative ideas and a variety of quick yet significant ways to connect with the rhythms of nature each day, not just on sabbats or the full moon. Make your home into a magickal place, work with the God and Goddess on a regular basis, and discover the magickal power of animals. From five-minute rituals and “hibernation vacations” to mini daily divinations, you can easily make the wisdom and practice of Witchcraft an enriching part of everyday life. Praise: “This is a book that deserves a place on all shelves for it is pertinent not only to the Pagan-inclined but to all who look to better their lives.”—Raymond Buckland, author of Buckland’s Complete Book of Witchcraft “A must-have for any Witch looking to evolve their practice from a mere study of the Craft into a fully fledged lifestyle.”—Melanie Marquis, author of A Witch's World of Magick and The Witch's Bag of Tricks

When the Goddess was a Woman

Mahābhārata Ethnographies - Essays by Alf Hiltebeitel

When the Goddess was a Woman

Bringing together Hiltebeitel's major essays on the the Mahābhārata, the Rāmāyaṇa, and the south Indian cults of Draupadī and Kūttāṇṭavar along with new articles written especially for this collection, this two volume work offers a comprehensive re-reading of the Indian epic tradition by the foremost scholar in Indian epic studies today.

Entranced by the Goddess

Folklore in North Indian Religion

Entranced by the Goddess

The Mother Goddess has been worshiped in India for at least three thousand years. Although often known as 'Mata' or 'Devi', she is also known by a myriad of names, with every village having its own local manifestation. Her devotees have established a rich tradition of ritual, lore and song. However few English-speaking people know the details of Indian goddess worship. Dr Chandola combines her north Indian origins with her training in anthropology to provide a unique insight into the millennia-old beliefs, lore, songs, pilgrimages and rituals. Even within India few people have direct experience of the trance rituals associated with goddess worship. During these seemingly-impossible acts are accomplished, such as licking red-hot metal without causing injury. Dr Chandola attended several of these trance rituals and provides a dramatic account of licking a red-hot metal ladle without harm. Some aspects of traditional Indian goddess worship have been known about in the West for over 200 years. Indeed, in a very confused way, this knowledge underlies modern pagans' veneration of a Great Goddess. Some modern pagans also seek trance states - although few, if any, with the dramatic consequences of these north Indian traditions! The final section of the book looks at how these traditional beliefs are adapting in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, both within Indian and among international Hindu communities. Entranced by the Goddess is essential reading for all those interested in Hinduism - both traditional and modern-day - or goddess worship - whether Indian or Western.

What Would Jackie Do?

An Inspired Guide to Distinctive Living

What Would Jackie Do?

We can’t help but want to be like her: Exuding unmatched poise and style, she continues to fascinate people of all ages. But how would Jackie have handled the twenty-first-century? What would she think about a society that celebrates outsized egos, instant everything, and casual rules of conduct? How might she dress for the office, scan for a man, accessorize a home—and get away from it all when necessary? With intriguing research, commentary from today’s experts, and fond reminiscences from those who knew and admired the first lady of perfection, journalists Shelly Branch and Sue Callaway now offer a sparkling answer to the question, What Would Jackie Do? Applying Jackie’s philosophies to every aspect of contemporary life, including relationships, office politics, family matters, and entertaining, What Would Jackie Do? is a trove of advice, featuring: • Noblesse Oblige for Beginners • How Not to be an Interchangeable Woman • Mastering the Effortless Rich look • The art of attachment: lessons on sex, marriage, and men of consequence • Career Whirl: Pearls for Getting Ahead • Caftan in a Kelly bag: How to travel beautifully • O- Behave! Anti-brat strategies for parents * En Suite Home: Perfecting Your Domestic Pitch The next best thing to having Jackie O. as a personal adviser, What Would Jackie Do? reveals the practical wisdom behind an icon and gives all readers a piece of the Jackie mystique, be it of the heart, the mind, or the home.

Triumph of the Goddess, The

The Canonical Models and Theological Visions of the Devi-Bhagavata Purana

Triumph of the Goddess, The

The authors of the Devi-Bhagavata Puranendeavored to demonstrate the superiority of the Devi over competing masculine deities, and to articulate in new ways the manifold nature of the Goddess. Brown's book sets out to examine how the Puranpursues these ends. The Devi-Bhagavata employs many ancient myths and motifs from older masculine theologies, incorporating them into a thoroughly "feminized" theological framework. The text also seeks to supplant older "masculine" canonical authorities. Part I of Brown's study explores these strategies by focusing on the Puran's self-conscious endeavor to supersede the famous VaisBhagavata Puran. The Devi-Bhagavata also re-envisions older mythological traditions about the Goddess, especially those in the first great Sanskritic glorification of the Goddess, the Devi-Mahatmya. Brown shows in Part II how this re-envisioning process transforms the Devi from a primarily martial and erotic goddess into the World-Mother of infinite compassion. Part III examines the Devi Gita, the philosophical climax of the Puranmodeled upon the Bhagavad Gita. The Devi Gita, while affirming that ultimate reality is the divine Mother, avows that her highest form as consciousness encompasses all gender, thereby suggesting the final triumph of the Goddess. It is not simply that She is superior to the male gods, but rather that She transcends Her own sexuality without denying it.

The Goddess and the Bull

Catalhoyuk: An Archaeological Journey to the Dawn of Civilization

The Goddess and the Bull

Thousands of years before the pyramids were built in Egypt and the Trojan War was fought, a great civilization arose on the Anatolian plains. The Goddess and the Bull details the dramatic quest by archaeologists to unearth the buried secrets of human cultural evolution at this huge, spectacularly well-preserved 9,500-year-old village in Turkey. Here lie the origins of modern society -- the dawn of art, architecture, religion, family -- even the first tangible evidence of human self-awareness, the world's oldest mirrors. Some archaeologists have claimed that the Mother Goddess was first worshipped at Çatalhöyük, which is now a site of pilgrimage for Goddess worshippers from all over the world. The excavations here have yielded the seeds of the Neolithic Revolution, when prehistoric humans first abandoned the hunter-gatherer life they had known for millions of years, invented farming, and began living in houses and communities. Michael Balter, the excavation's official biographer, brings readers behind the scenes, providing the first inside look at the remarkable site and its history of scandal and thrilling scientific discovery. He tells the very human story of two colorful men: British archaeologist James Mellaart, who discovered Çatalhöyük in 1958 only to be banned from working at the site forever after a fabulous ancient treasure disappeared without a trace; and Ian Hodder, a pathbreaking archaeological rebel who reinvented the way archaeology is practiced and reopened the excavation after it had lain dormant for three decades. Today Hodder leads an international team of more than one hundred archaeologists who continue to probe the site's secrets. Balter reveals the true story behind modern archaeology -- the thrill of history-making scientific discovery as well as the crushing disappointments, the community and friendship, the love affairs, and the often bitter rivalries between warring camps of archaeologists. Along the way, Balter describes the cutting-edge advances in archaeological science that have allowed the team at Çatalhöyük to illuminate the central questions of human existence.

Revelry, Rivalry, and Longing for the Goddesses of Bengal

The Fortunes of Hindu Festivals

Revelry, Rivalry, and Longing for the Goddesses of Bengal

Annually during the months of autumn, Bengal hosts three interlinked festivals to honor its most important goddesses: Durga, Kali, and Jagaddhatri. While each of these deities possesses a distinct iconography, myth, and character, they are all martial. Durga, Kali, and Jagaddhatri often demand blood sacrifice as part of their worship and offer material and spiritual benefits to their votaries. Richly represented in straw, clay, paint, and decoration, they are similarly displayed in elaborately festooned temples, thronged by thousands of admirers. The first book to recount the history of these festivals and their revelry, rivalry, and nostalgic power, this volume marks an unprecedented achievement in the mapping of a major public event. Rachel Fell McDermott describes the festivals' origins and growth under British rule. She identifies their iconographic conventions and carnivalesque qualities and their relationship to the fierce, Tantric sides of ritual practice. McDermott confronts controversies over the tradition of blood sacrifice and the status-seekers who compete for symbolic capital. Expanding her narrative, she takes readers beyond Bengal's borders to trace the transformation of the goddesses and their festivals across the world. McDermott's work underscores the role of holidays in cultural memory, specifically the Bengali evocation of an ideal, culturally rich past. Under the thrall of the goddess, the social, political, economic, and religious identity of Bengalis takes shape.

Stalking the Goddess

Stalking the Goddess

In 1948 Robert Graves published The White Goddess. His study of poetic mysticism and goddess worship has since become a founding text of Western paganism. As Wicca emerged from what Graves called, a few hopeful young people in California, to over two million strong, The White Goddess has achieved near liturgical status. This rising appreciation brings all the problems of liturgical texts. Many pagans consider Graves’ work like the goddess herself; awe inspiring but impenetrable. Stalking The Goddess is the first extensive examination of this enigmatic text to come from the pagan community and guides readers through bewildering forests of historical sources, poems, and Graves’ biography to reveal his unorthodox claims and entrancing creative process. Relentlessly perusing each path, it explores the uncharted woods and reveals the hidden signposts Graves has posted. The hunt for the goddess spans battlefields, ancient manuscripts, the British museum, and Stonehenge. En route we encounter not only the goddess herself but her three sacred animals; dog, roebuck, and lapwing. Perhaps the muse cannot be captured on her own grounds, but now at least there is a map.